Companions of the Curtain

Throughout the history of stage and film, friendships between characters often become larger than life They’re classic bonds of camaraderie that have endured the tests of time. From the screen to the stage, through the generations, there have been memorable character friendships that have become synonymous with the show or play in which they’re portrayed.... Continue Reading →

Twerk from Home

The seductive, titillating, sexy and sassy dance show first jumped out of the proverbial birthday cake nearly 30 years ago and three decades later it’s still bringing allure to stages from coast to coast. After more than a year cooling off, the heat will once again turn when Broadway Bares brings some virtual virility to... Continue Reading →

SHOCKING NEWS! Jobsite’s getting weird this June

Guest Blogger and Jobsite Artistic Director David M. Jenkins gives Caught in the Act a look inside the nightmares and belly laughs of Shockheaded Peter https://videopress.com/v/dpzfcUxr?preloadContent=metadata A little bit Tim Burton, a little bit Edward Gorey, Shockheaded Peter is the phantasmagorical staging of Heinrich Hoffman’s 1845 pitch-black children’s book, Der Struwwelpeter. It’s a self-proclaimed “junk... Continue Reading →

The Stars in The Stars and Stripes

Can serving in the military help prepare you for a performing arts career? Some celebrities began their careers off-stage, serving in the armed forces. While there are many performers who are veterans, we shine a light here on a few in recognition of Military Appreciation Month. James Earl Jones, a multiple Tony®-Award winner who also... Continue Reading →

Artists We Love: Gregory Hines

In Honor of National Tap Dance Day, May 25 The talent embodied by one of the Artists We Love – actor and tap dancer extraordinaire Gregory Hines – literally started at the tips of his toes and the bottom of his heels. Born in New York City on Valentine’s Day 1946 to Alma and Maurice... Continue Reading →

Swan Dive

“It might be a good idea to call all ballets Swan Lake. That way, people will come!” - George Balanchine For a good portion of the mid to late 20th century, the neoclassical and plotless ballets, typified by the works of George Balanchine, were the favor of choreographers. Music and technique-driven ballets such as Serenade... Continue Reading →

Breaking Good

We expect to see gymnasts, divers, volleyball players and runners in the summer Olympics. But B-boys and B-girls? For the first time, in the 2024 Olympics to be held in Paris, breakers will be competing for gold, silver and bronze medals. Says Tatiana Sophia Eriksen, who teaches breaking and other forms of hip-hop dance for... Continue Reading →

Why don’t oysters give to charity?

Because they're shellfish. It's no coincidence that National Humor Month begins with April Fool's Day, a day which has sanctioned frivolity and amusement for hundreds of years. "National Humor Month was conceived as a means to heighten public awareness of the therapeutic value of humor. Laughter and joy - the benchmarks of humor - lead... Continue Reading →

Artists We Love: August Wilson

For many, the only relationship they have with August Wilson is through movies based on his plays: The Piano Lesson, Oscar®-winning Fences and most recently Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom, starring Viola Davis and the late Chadwick Boseman, both nominated for Academy Awards® in their roles. Those movies are just a slice of the breadth of... Continue Reading →

World Storytelling Day

By Walt Belcher Let me tell you a story. Once upon a time, I was not aware that oral storytelling was a performance art form that I could do. I had heard of The Moth, that monthly story slam out of New York, and I knew that some authors, such as humorist David Sedaris, can... Continue Reading →

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